5 Tips From a Senior Column

Liam Struck, Reviews Editor

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I don’t write this to pretend I’m the Buddha or someone that has any significance in this world, I write this because I’m a senior in highschool and I’ve seen and done some stupid stuff.

First of all, DON’T SMOKE WEED. Well at least not when you’re stressed about school. That might sound weird because isn’t it more socially acceptable to use marijuana when you’re anxious or stressed?  This is true, but there’s a time and a place. If you want to smoke a day before a test you haven’t studied for then (depending on whose class) you can kiss your sweet gpa goodbye. And if you do this constantly then you may as well bury your gpa. Marijuana is great in many ways but not when you have an assignment due the next period or you haven’t started your project that’s due next week. I mean really, do whatever you want but if you want to get into a good school, don’t be smokin on that good good every gosh dang day.

Second of all, protect your car no matter what. I cannot tell you how much I regret losing my sweet Sheila (My 2002 blue honda CRV). I could do anything I could ever want in that car. Late night dive for pizza? Check. Got a girl that’s not appropriate for the folks? Perfect. Tinder date? Perfect. I had all I could ever need, but then one fateful night Sheila was totalled. Life since then has been anything but perfect. After school it’s a nightmare figuring out which friend you can ask for a ride home from. When track starts it’s even worse because most of the people you could rely on are all busy running. Worse than the anxiety induced fear of not finding a ride home is the humility of it all. I’m a goddamn senior in high school and I’m asking for rides like a freshman? It’s ridiculous, humiliating and devastating. Moral of the story is DON’T RUIN YOUR CAR.

Thirdly, don’t trip about your grades too much. Enjoy high school, it’s a time of learning and grinding for college but don’t let your perfect 4.0 let you miss out on once in lifetime opportunities. Numerous people have told me how much they regret not being more social or crying late night because of an AP test the next day. Study for your tests but don’t make yourself anti-social, you’ll regret it in your later years when you get into yale but don’t know the first thing to say when you meet your random roommate.

Fourthly, on a completely contradictory point, GRADES MATTER. Don’t let these new age socialist/communist teachers like Mike Todd get into your head with their “grades don’t matter” propaganda. My starting out High-School Gpa got boned down after my sophomore year when I just couldn’t care less about class. I would skip classes, do the rest that comes with skipping classes in high school, not study and turn it assignments late or in some cases never. Ever since I have been trying to dig my way out of that and it wasn’t worth it. So don’t hyperventilate if you got a A- on  your psych final, but be worried if you don’t even know what unit you’re doing in class.

Fively? fifthly? number 5ly? Don’t give a f#@k. It’s not worth it, just don’t. People always have something to say, no matter who it’s about or what’s it about everybody wants their 2 cents in.  So regardless of what you do or say, people are going to talk about you.. So give them something to talk about. I used to be rather salty at this whole high-school gossip phenomenon but really it’s just a part of life (for high school anyway) and you can either let it affect you or not. I chose not to and I think i’m 80 percent happier than those who care about what everybody thinks about them. This is different if you have an anxiety disorder I guess but still find a supportive group and BE YOURSELF. There’s too many fake ass clowns at this school as it is, don’t be another.

That’s all Ames High. Thank you Mom and Dad for always believing in me when things got tough. Thank you Darin Johnson for putting up with me for three years. Thank you Samantha Edster for reaching out and helping me. Thank you John Burke for your countless hours spent trying to figure out my schedule. Thank you Brekke for being a resentful step dad towards me but also being actively engaged in my works, your feedback has inspired me to do more writing and to better myself as a person. Thank you Tinder for being there when no one else was. Lastly, thank you Ames High. You’ve taught me more than you could ever know. Thank you.

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