The Parking Lot Plight

A+salt+field%2C+because+I+am+salty
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The Parking Lot Plight

A salt field, because I am salty

A salt field, because I am salty

A salt field, because I am salty

A salt field, because I am salty

Shelby Reeves, Reporter

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I am one of the youngest in my grade. I am so young in fact that there are sophomores that are older than me. I didn’t turn sixteen until this past summer and didn’t find a car until the middle of this year. My parents drove me almost everywhere for two and a half years of my high school career. Yet, never in this time was I dropped off in the student parking lot before class and I’m still alive.

There is a growing epidemic of underclassmen having their minivan driving mothers  drop them off at the front of the parking lot, not the circle driveway. I am nearly murdered by one of these parents at least twice a week. While I’m trying to find a parking spot and mind my own business at 7:45 am, I have to worry about an erratic parent who is late for work drive down the middle of the parking lot and come bumper to bumper with my car. This is a bit much for that early in the morning. What’s worse is staggering half-awake out of my car to see a line of parents blocking my way to a class I’m probably a few minutes late for already.

We have a system for parking. The spots in the front fill up first and the rest of us park more to the back as the front spots fill up. It works because we don’t have to worry about getting run over by our peers. With all of these parents roaming the parking lot my life is at risk.

All drama aside, this is super irritating. There is nothing shameful about dropping your kid off in one of the assigned parent drop off circles in front of the school. Believe me, I’ve been there. It takes a couple minutes more to wait in the drop off area and you won’t receive groggy, dirty glares from upperclassmen who had to drag themselves out of bed and somehow manage to make it to school in one piece. For my sake and the sake of the rest of the upperclassmen, do what you’re supposed to do.

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