The student newspaper of, by, and for Ames High School.

The WEB

50°
The student newspaper of, by, and for Ames High School.

The WEB

The student newspaper of, by, and for Ames High School.

The WEB

Super Robot Baby: an explosion of flavor and sonic pleasure

It first begins with the foot tapping. Then it progresses to the head bobbing. Soon, the entire body is caught up in the exhilarating (and sometimes embarrassing) movement known as dancing. With this experience in mind, the band Super Robot Baby hopes to spur their listeners on to take part in the thrill of dancing with their unique sound. The members of Super Robot Baby include sophomores Louis Dupuis, Sam Ennis, and Hangil Lee, and junior Tom Gehring. The structure of the band itself is an unusual one – Dupuis, Ennis, and Lee all play keyboards while Gehring plays drums. “It’s an interesting combination, but it works.” sophomore Breeana Glenn said. The band’s formation is relatively recent. “Sam, Louis, and I already knew each other really well. I don’t know how Tom came in.” Lee joked. During their freshman year, the three sophomores met Gehring during jazz band. Shortly after their creation, Super Robot Baby made their presence known at Ames High when they first performed at last year’s Fellowship of the Bands under the name “Kronk Inshvestor” and ignited a spontaneous dance party during their show. Super Robot Baby prides itself on its ability to be appealing to not only the ears but the eyes as well. During their lively performances, the members can be found looking rather sharp for a high school band, with their white collared shirts and black dress pants (or dress shorts, in the case of Ennis). “We just try to match. We wear [the outfits] ‘cause they’re gorgeous. They make us look like legends.” Dupuis said. “We spend a lot of band time deciding what we’re gonna wear.” Lee admitted. But even with its fondness for matching outfits, it is ultimately the original sound of the band that makes Super Robot Baby remarkable. “They have an amazing fusion sound.” sophomore Brady Brinkmeyer said. With influences from electronic and dance music, Super Robot Baby has been noted for their catchy beats, and their highly danceable songs. The four had trouble coming to an agreement about how many songs that they had; after a bit of discussion, they eventually agreed that they had “easily over four” songs. Their songs include covers of “Blue”, “Axel F”, and “Everytime We Touch”. Even though a majority of Super Robot Baby’s works are covers, the band emphasized the fact that their covers are not cliché copies. “We try to put an original twist on all the songs we play.” Dupuis said. Super Robot Baby also has original works as well, one example being a song titled “Tsunami”. Fans of the band praised Super Robot Baby’s covers, but also expressed a desire for more originals. “Their covers are really good, but I would really like more original stuff,” sophomore Torry Hand said. “Their covers are what’ll make them big, but their original stuff is what’ll keep them going.” When asked if they had any new songs in the making, the band members didn’t make any promises, but affirmed that progress was being made. “It’s in the chemistry lab.” Ennis said. While Super Robot Baby is hoping to make new songs, it is also hoping to have some performances in the near future. The band stated there was a possibility of playing a song with Strawberry Tree, another Ames High band, at the Battle of the Bands during Homecoming week. “We’re looking forward to playing at [Battle of the Bands], if we do play.” Ennis said. The band also encouraged their fans to learn more about them by visiting their MySpace (myspace.com/superrobotbaby) or their website (www.superrobotbaby.tk). Super Robot Baby has proven to be a breath of fresh air in the local music scene, drawing appreciation from the students at Ames High. “It’s not hip-hop or grinding music; it’s just dance music.” Glenn said. With fans requesting new music, and a possible performance in the works, there are many tasks at hand for Super Robot Baby, but it still has its purpose in mind. Gehring stated it best: “We want to make [our music] so it’s irresistible to dance to. We make people fly. Theoretically, of course. But they’re flying in their minds.”

Story continues below advertisement
Leave a Comment
Donate to The WEB
$300
$450
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of Ames High School, and Iowa needs student journalists. Your contribution will allow us to cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The WEB
$300
$450
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

The WEB staff encourages you to exercise your First Amendment rights in this public forum. To comment, click on the "logged in" link below. Then click on the Google icon and sign in using your Google school account.

Do not post comments that are obscene or libelous. Refrain from writing comments that use copyrighted materials or that involve personal attacks, insults or threats. And please relate all comments to the story.
All The WEB Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.