The student newspaper of, by, and for Ames High School.

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The student newspaper of, by, and for Ames High School.

The WEB

The student newspaper of, by, and for Ames High School.

The WEB

Steve Irwin dies

Most people have heard the name Steve Irwin in passing, but he is much more recognizable by the title of his first show on animal planet, The Crocodile Hunter. On Sep. 4, 2006, Steve Irwin died off the coast of Queensland, Australia. While filming a documentary, he was pierced in the heart by the poisonous tail of a stingray. This incredibly rare occurrence has happened only a handful of times over the past century. “His death was kind of fitting though,” senior Phillip Uhde said. “I mean, can you see him dying in a car crash or something?” At the time this occurred, Irwin was accompanied by his producer and long time friend, John Stainton. Although this event was caught on tape, it will never be available to the public. Stainton has said publicly that after the local police have finished with it, the tape will be destroyed. “It was so sad, but he kind of had it coming,” senior Renee Bovinette said. During his life, Irwin accomplished many astounding things. In addition to being The Crocodile Hunter, he appeared in the 2001 film Doctor Dolittle 2, as well as starred in the 2002 film The Crocodile Hunter: Collision Course. In 2001, Irwin was awarded the Centenary medal for his efforts towards global conservation and Australian tourism. Later, he was nominated for Australian of the Year. In 1991, a family run zoo was turned over to him. He soon expanded it and renamed it Australia Zoo. At this zoo, he later met his wife while performing a demonstration. In addition to taking care of animals in captivity, Irwin had long been an influential supporter of conservation. Irwin believed he could promote his beliefs of environmentalism by trying to share his excitement with the natural world. Instead of telling people about dangerous crocodiles, he would approach them to show why they are dangerous. Some of Irwin’s most profound influences have been in environmentalism. He has long supported and helped protect many species. Irwin once referred to himself as the “wild-life warrior,” because of his fighting for nature. Like many warriors before him, he has fallen in battle, but will be immortalized by his courage and his acts.

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